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Can Dogs Eat Peas?

05/24/2019 by Scritch
May 24th, 2019 by Scritch
        

can dogs eat peas

The quick answer: Yes, dogs can eat peas.

Green peas, including sugar snap peas, snow peas, and English peas are safe to share with your dog. In fact, you may find that your dog already eats peas as they are a common ingredient in many dog foods. Dogs can eat peas fresh, frozen, thawed, or boiled so long as they are plain and free of sodium.

Benefits of peas

Peas are low in calories and high in protein, fiber and antioxidants. This nutritious vegetable contains vitamins A, K and B vitamins, as well as iron, zinc, potassium and magnesium. Peas are a good substitute to give to an overweight dog on a diet instead of high-calorie dog treats.

Hazards

Dogs with kidney problems should not eat peas because they contain a naturally occurring substance called purines. Purines produce uric acid that can be filtered by healthy kidneys. However, for dogs with kidney problems, too much uric acid can cause kidney stones and other issues with the kidneys.

Peas and other fruits and vegetables should be served in moderation. Consuming too much can cause tummy troubles, including vomiting and diarrhea. As a general rule, vegetables should make up no more than 10-20% of your pet’s diet.

Though plain peas are safe to share, it’s best to avoid feeding your dog canned peas or any peas that have been seasoned, salted, or cooked with other vegetables like onions and garlic. Canned peas contain added sodium which is unhealthy for your dog, and garlic, onions, or seasonings made with them are toxic to dogs.

Be careful when sharing pea pods; though they are not toxic, they could cause issues. Some dogs may be able to eat pea pods just fine, but for others, they could pose a choking hazard or cause an internal blockage. Use your best judgment or consider chopping the pods into bite-sized pieces.

This post brought to you by our friends at Scritch. Scritch combines everything you need to make pet parenting easy and fun in one online destination. Download the app (iOS & Android) or visit ScritchSpot.com to find out more!






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