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Pet Care. Pet Training. Pet Stories.
Pet Care. Pet Training. Pet Stories.


Why Do Cats Have a Favorite Person?

09/24/2020 by Stacy Painter
September 24th, 2020 by Stacy Painter
        

If you’ve ever lived with cats in a household of multiple people, you may have noticed that some cats tend to prefer a particular person over others. Whether or not a cat has a favorite person and how strong that preference is varies with each cat depending on several factors, including how well socialized the cat was during its first few months of kittenhood.

When looking back to cats’ domestication, the bond between people and cats likely began when cats learned that humans are a good source of food, protection, and companionship. But what makes a cat prefer one person over another?

Why cats choose a favorite person

The reason a cat will gravitate toward one person, in particular, may come down to communication. Though cats are often portrayed as aloof and independent, they are quite the communicators, and they have a special appreciation for people who can understand their needs.

In addition to meowing for various reasons, cats also use many body language cues to express how they are feeling. If one person can better communicate with a cat and understand what it is trying to say, the cat may be more drawn to that person.

Your ability to adapt to your cat’s preferred method of communication can influence the success of your relationship. Every cat is different, so the appropriate response to your cat’s meows and body language signs may include physical interaction, playtime, respecting their space, or (of course) food.

Aside from being able to communicate, a cat may choose someone as their favorite simply because they provide the best lap for catnaps.

How to be your cat’s favorite person

  • Socialize with them from the beginning. Teach your cat that you are a reliable source for social interaction by offering play, cuddles, or just gently talking to them if they are shy.
  • Respect their personal space. Social interaction is essential, but some cats also need alone time. If your cat wanders off to hide or nap, give them a bit of time to decompress.
  • Look for communication cues. Your cat may approach you when seeking something, such as food or interaction, whether that’s in the form of playtime, cuddles, or just basking in your presence.

Remember that building a solid and lasting relationship takes time. Some cats may be quicker to bond than others, but remain patient and give your cat space and time to adapt and build their trust with you.